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Rotten onion

Right after the Lizard Squad finished with a DDOS attack on the PSN and XBOX networks, they launched an attack against the Tor anonymity system. The attack was simple, set up enough Tor relays to be able to identify a significant fraction of Tor users and connect them with their activity. They got caught because they were bozos (perhaps intentionally). They did the attack hard and fast, which made it easy to identify the rogue relays, and they bragged about it (which told people to look for the attack). (more…)

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CCC Censored

The Chaos Computer Club recently announced that their website was being blocked by Vodefone as part of their participation in the “Great Firewall of Britain”. This is somewhat concerning as they don’t seem to match any of the criteria for blocking that have been announced. This also blocks access to information and tickets for their upcoming conference. Many people predicted (me, EFF, and many others)  that this censorship system would inevitable overreach when it was first announced. (more…)

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Party in limo

In two separate cases recently Uber has, or has talked about, abusing its information about their customer’s movements.

First a Buzzed reporter Johana Bhuiyan was told that she was tracked on the way to a meeting by Josh Mohrer, general manager of Uber New York.

Next Emil Michael, SVP of business for Uber, talked at a private dinner about the possibility of using the information Uber has about hostile reporters to gather dirt on them. (more…)

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Dark Hotel hall

Kaspersky recently announced the discovery of a new Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) that they are calling DarkHotel. This is in the fine tradition of giving all newly discovered hackers or vulnerabilities clever and evil sounding names. In this case they have found something quite interesting.

For the last 7 years a group has been systematically targeting executives and government officials staying at high end hotels. They hack their computers and grab their files, sniff their keyboards, and install virus that can then spread within the victim’s organization. (more…)

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USB connectorA couple of months ago researcher Karsten Nohl demonstrated a security vulnerability that he called BadUSB. Basically it was a demonstration that an attacker could alter the firmware in a USB device to automatically attack anything it was plugged in to. At the recent DerbyCon, researchers Adam Caudill and Brandon Wilson demonstrated their version of the attack and released sample code for how to implement it. This really opens pandora’s box.

The problem here is that this is not actually a bug in USB. It is exactly how USB is designed to work (as insecure as that might be), and changing that behavior is likely to break a lot of other things. A good and effective fix for this vulnerability is probably years away.

In the mean time, take great care with USB devices. My suggestion is to never use another person’s USB device. Don’t use USB to transfer files, and make sure that any USB devices you do use are obtained directly in unopened packaging. There could still be exploits introduced in manufacturing, but at least you are as safe as reasonably possible.

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Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

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