The Privacy BlogThoughts on privacy, security, and other stuff.

Standard Profile PictureOn Sunday I appeared on The Social Network Show talking about general privacy and security issues. Follow the link below for the show’s post and audio.

The Social Network Show on KDWN Presents Lance Cottrell — The Social Network Station

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

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HiRes

Irish Data Protection Commissioner Billy Hawkes has stepped in to have a database of civil registration records removed from the website IrishGenealogy.ie. The problem is that the database contains information on living persons which is often used for identity verification.

That would include things like mother’s maiden name and birth date. While these are public records, previously they had required payment of a fee, and it was not easily searchable on-line.

Of course, in the era of social media, these kinds of authenticators should have been disposed of long ago. Too many of them can be easily discovered by looking through Facebook accounts and the like.

This case also highlights the troubling nature of public records. In the past records were public in the sense that anyone could go to a government building and access the paper records. They could not be easily be searched as a whole, and the entirety of the records pulled into a private database. This is a kind of security by obscurity, but a useful one. With Internet records, many people are not comfortable with just how public much of this information is. The old inconvenience placed a low but real barrier to data access, effectively insuring that it was only done for specific people and for specific purposes. It is not at all clear how to get that without loosing all the advantages of Internet accessibility.

Personal details removed from site over ‘identity theft’ concerns

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

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China open gate

Multiple sources are reporting that Google services are once again available in China. They had been blocked in the lead up to the 25th anniversary of Tiananmen Square protests.

Access to Google services within China returns | Reuters

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

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Broken cyber lock

Fake Google Digital Certificates Found & Confiscated

On July 2, Google engineers discovered unauthorized certificates for Google domains in circulation. They had been issued by the National Informatics Center in India. They are a trusted sub-authority under the Indian Controller of Certifying Authorities (CCA). They in turn are part of the Microsoft Root Store of certificates, so just about any program running on Windows, including Explorer and Chrome, will trust the unauthorized certificates.

The power of this attack is that the holder of the private key to the certificate can impersonate secure Google servers. Your browser would not report any security alerts because the certificate is “properly” signed and trusted within the built in trust hierarchy.

Firefox does not have the CCA in its root certificate list and so is not affected. Likewise Mac OS, iOS, Android, and Chrome OS are safe from this particular incident as well.

It is not known exactly why these certificates were issued, but the obvious use would be national surveillance.

While this attack seems to be targeted to India and only impacts the Microsoft ecosystem, the larger problem is much more general. There is a long list of trusted certificate authorities, which in turn delegate trust to a vast number of sub-authorities, any of whom can trivially create certificates for any domain which would be trusted by your computer.

In this case the attack was detected quickly, but if it had been very narrowly targeted detection would have been very unlikely and monitoring could have continued over very long periods.

As an end user, you can install Certificate Patrol in Firefox to automatically detect when a website’s certificate is changed. This would detect this kind of attack.

On Chrome you should enable “Check for server certificate revocation” in advanced settings. That will at least allow quick protection once a certificate is compromised.

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Update: Microsoft has issued an emergency patch removing trust from the compromised authority.

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Russia Flag Keyboard

Continuing the pattern of Internet restrictions I talked about before, Russia has passed a new law requiring Internet companies to keep the personal data of Russians in data centers within the country. The ostensible reason for this is to protect Russians against US Government snooping (in the wake of the Snowden leaks), and against other outside threats.

The law requires that companies doing business in Russia must open data centers within the borders by 2016 or be blocked.

There are many ways for people motivated to bypass these restriction to access whatever they want, but most people will just use what is available, giving the Russian government more ability to monitor the activities of their citizens themselves. 

Russia passes law requiring online personal data to be stored inside its borders | The Verge

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

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